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Lifeway Mobility Blog

Removing a Stair lift

Posted by John Burfield on 9/23/17 10:42 AM

Some people are reluctant to have a stair lift installed in their home because they are worried about what to do with it when it is no longer needed and what their staircase may look like after it is removed.  Fortunately, these problems are easy to address, so that you can use your stair lift worry free.

Removal Services

There are several low or no-cost options for removal once a stair lift is no longer needed.  Some providers offer a buyback program for stair lifts that they sell and install.  The price they are willing to pay to buy back the lift typically depends on the make, model, and condition it is in.  The provider will often refurbish these stair lifts and resell them at a discounted price or add them to a rental fleet.  Typically, they will remove these stair lifts at no cost. 

Providers that do not offer a buyback program, will likely remove a stair lift and take it away at no cost if there is an opportunity to reuse the lift.  If the stair lift is too old for reuse or damaged beyond repair, they will typically uninstall and remove the lift for a small fee.

If you know that your needs will be temporary, many providers offer rental options including rent-to-own should you decide to keep the stair lift. Many people learn to love their stair lift after using it and decide they’d like to keep it!! The rental fee will usually include an installation and removal fee. 

Stair Repair

Stair lifts are installed by bolting the rail into the treads of your stairs and will not damage walls.  A straight rail is typically bolted into every 3 to 4 stairs and a curved rail into every other stair.   Once removed, there will be approximately 4 screw holes in these steps.  Fortunately, these holes are small and will not affect the integrity or safety of the steps. 

However, some may find these holes unsightly and choose to repair them. This is relatively easy and consists of filling the holes with wood filler or plugs that that match the color of the wood. This can usually be done as a DYI project or by a handyman.   If you have carpeting on the stairs, the holes are small enough that they typically go unnoticed without repair.

These pictures were taken after a stair lift removal by Lifeway Mobility in Connecticut. As you can see the, staircase is in good shape and the impact to the steps is minimal.

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Topics: Stair Lift, Accessibility Equipment, Aging-In-Place, Accessibility